Less Tits n' Ass, More Kickin' Ass

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Disney: Say No to the Merida Makeover, Keep Our Hero Brave!

Thanks for the heads up, perpetuallurkernazanin, I definitely signed this one. 

I invite you to do the same, tumblrs!

May 9

dawnbest:

reftastic:

swegener:

Speaking of different body shapes. These are all basically peak human bodies. 

How come 99% of them don’t conform to what the entertainment industry tells us is the perfect body?

This is a FABULOUS set of body refs. So glad this came back across my dash so I could reblog it here :D

Totally reblogging it too cuz I lost it the last 3294 times I saw it on the interbutts. GJ!

I know you probably have seen this before, but here it is again. I love that this includes males bodies as well, and is a great reference for anyone wanting to design a various cast of characters. The mere size difference between some neighbours on some photos should give you artists great pointers on how to portray height variation in a believable way to your viewers!

(Also that way I have it in a place I’l remember and will be able to get it whenever I need it so there.)

May 1

This blog should be the basis of a course taught at the art schools that have a cartooning major. I attended the School of Visual Art for cartooning years ago, and it's aggravating even today to remember all the young guys (and sometimes girls) who entered drawing classes with a preconceived notion of what women should look like, because they'd grown up on DC and Marvel, and that's who they wanted to work for. I love what you're doing and promoting here, though. Please continue.

Thank you so much! 

I try to do my part with the blog, and also when I teach panels in conventions. I would draw simplified art because my first love was TV cartoons, but remember learning more complex, detailed art by looking at Jim Lee and Rob Liefeld’s work in X-Men and X-Force back in the 80s, which means I was treating women’s pelvises like a Barbie doll’s due to what I was seeing in the art. Anatomy for Artists books have saved me from that, and later life drawing classes were a godsend. 

It’s like they say, you must learn the rules before you break them. Style needs to develop from a solid base. 

Ooh, actually, readers, make a tumblr search for “Tanglefoot” (no, wait, let me do it for you) to find REALLY interesting character designs and posing that takes the rules, knows them, and breaks them in the most awesome, enticing way. Love this work!

May 1

It's less about the exaggeration, but more about how they exaggerate it. While yes the muscles on comic guys are pretty insane themselves, it's for guys to have an awesome asskicking figure that's ideal for them. When they exaggerate females its for eye candy, not for a good role model.

Anonymous

Yup. It’s something called false equivalence, as I’m sure you know. Besides, I’ve said it several times previously in this blog, if someone has their own fixes of male anatomy in comics, I’d LOVE to see it, and most likely would follow it. It’s just not my focus here. 

Thanks for chiming in!

May 1

Other Anon obviously didn't see your Harley Quinn or Star Wars redraws. So much more dynamic than the originals! Better story telling right there.

Anonymous

Thanks! I really appreciate the comments!

It’s always more difficult to redraw something that was broken originally in the same kind of pose without losing dynamism. Much easier to start from scratch. 

May 1

If an artist needs to draw something unnatural to make the dynamics of a character illustration work, they designed the character wrong. Fix the real problems, bandaid solutions make for pretty mediocre cartooning.

This. 

May 1

Did you know that when artists draw things, they can exaggerate them? Did you know that the hyper-muscular men in comics are also unrealistic? Did you know that wearing spandex actually doesn't highlight every contour and muscle on the body the way it looks in comics? Now, I'm not saying "oh, you're totally wrong and it's fine to make women real sexy all the time," but you're discrediting your own side. These "fixed" drawings are less dynamic. Sometimes the hair needs to blow the wrong way.

Anonymous

Thanks for writing. Yes, I am aware of these things, and they have been addressed previously in the blog. Please feel free to browse the archives to find the answers to all your questions. 

eschergirls:

ghostarin submitted:

Redrew this
I’m certainly not the best at stuff like this, but at least she’s not broken anymore.I could have spread the legs a -little- more to make it more dynamic though.
I also fixed her top/collar cause I couldn’t figure out how they made sense in the other picture. I also gave her shorts under her… kimono-thing. I figured if you knew your dress would constantly give you panty shots, I’d wear shorts under. I think most would do that.

eschergirls:

ghostarin submitted:

Redrew this

I’m certainly not the best at stuff like this, but at least she’s not broken anymore.I could have spread the legs a -little- more to make it more dynamic though.

I also fixed her top/collar cause I couldn’t figure out how they made sense in the other picture. I also gave her shorts under her… kimono-thing. I figured if you knew your dress would constantly give you panty shots, I’d wear shorts under. I think most would do that.

I just read your post about sex not really selling, and I had a vague memory of an article that suggested sex only sells sex. That is: Even if it's easy to use boobs to get a guys attention, he only remembers the boobs and not the product they're selling. I know this is true for me. There was a recent video game that was notable for the huge breasts on the sorceress character. I'd recognize the character due to the breasts but I couldn't tell you the game name if you had a gun to my head.

That’s actually pretty accurate. One of the “sex in advertising” articles I found in my quick Google search before posting the previous post mentions that using a sexualised context makes people less likely to recall the brand name (Wikipedia): 

 A 2005 research by MediaAnalyzer has found that less than 10% of men recalled the brand of sexual ads, compared to more than 19% of non sexual ads; a similar result was found on women (10.8% vs. 22.3%). It is hypothesized by that survey, that this is a result of a general numbing caused by sexual stimuli[…]

Either it’s a numbing, or it’s an over-stimulation which blocks out a person’s powers of noticing stuff. ;)

I just found this blog today and have been having a blast going through it. And, I saw claims on here saying that T&A hurts sales and I was wondering if you have any sources/articles that say so that I can read. I tried to find it myself but my google-fu is weak today.

Anonymous

Hi! Glad you’re having a blast and enjoying what I’m showing here.

I don’t specifically document and bookmark news articles that make these claims, but luckily, I knew I’d read one recently and found it in my browser history. You can read it here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-21033708

Marketing strategies may also be responsible for sexist covers. But the mantra that sex sells may not be accurate.

According to 2012 data from publishing industry analysts Codex Group, less overtly explicit covers in fact have a wider appeal among general readers.

Jim Hines mimicking book cover

Codex Chief Executive Officer Peter Hildick-Smith remains puzzled why science fiction and fantasy publishers sell sexualised covers.

“My guess is that it has simply evolved as category convention, allowing book buyers to instantly know that a given books is in one of their preferred categories,” he said.

Photos above are of a book cover next to author Jim Hines, who blogs photos reenacting ridiculous female poses on novel covers (and some comics ones, too). Look it up, it is SO worth it.

It appears the Codex Group has a website here: http://www.codexgroup.net/ but the webpage is limited to a splash page with a contact email address. 

You can also Google “Sex Sells” and “sex in advertising” for hits that basically say that yes, men (sic) will buy your stuff, but be careful, you might turn off other demographics, and if you use sex out of context, you’ll lose your customers too.

What it all comes down to is that too many marketing people in comics still believe for some reason that only horny teenage straight boys read comics, and therefore, these are the only people comics will be marketed to. By doing this, they are actually repelling not just 50% of the market (by this I mean the female population, although some women MIGHT like the out-of-context-T&A?), but also every other person who’s not interested in getting female sexualisation splashed on every page, regardless of their age, gender, or sexual identity. See my explanation in the last post about how I have no interest in reading Savage Wolverine DESPITE the fact that I really like Wolverine as a character. 

So if you take me as an example, I can tell you that T&A hurts the chances of me buying the comics that use it. And I know I’m not alone. Maybe that’s all the proof you need.