Less Tits n' Ass, More Kickin' Ass

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Every time I see someone say, “Who cares?” about either my own posts or those of other tumblrs on the subject of female representation in comics, I want to point out to them the over 5000 people who’ve subscribed to lesstitsnass (holy crap over 5000?!), the other thousands and thousands of people who follow eschergirls, all the other blogs that do redlines, The Hawkeye Initiative’s slew of participants, the multitudes of articles and comments on all the online magazines that discuss the subject, and say, “Them. They care. There’s a whole lot of them. So get your head out of your butt and try to see what they see.”

- Karine at lesstitsnass

Sep 7

Hi! I appreciate what you're doing here on this blog (editing art to what you think it should be based on proper proportions, etc.). I think it's great. But I have to wonder - and I'm not sure if it's already been asked here or not - would comics and illustrations still sell as well if they were to stop sexualizing/making "babes" out of their female characters? I'm just trying to see both sides of the issue here. Thanks!

Anonymous

Have some links! 

http://lesstitsnass.tumblr.com/post/95479108617/nice-redraws-on-these-comic-covers-i-have-issues

http://lesstitsnass.tumblr.com/post/48011311548/i-just-found-this-blog-today-and-have-been-having-a

I’m not advocating for the end of sexy. I am saying that you CAN have sexy women drawn like they are actually people. I am also saying that women have other functions than being sexy in comics, and it’d be nice to see more of that. 

Also think about how many women feel when all they see in comics are babes drawn for the straight male gaze, and how they feel when they see women drawn as actually kick ass people. If more comics had the latter rather than the former, you’d be selling to all these no longer uncomfortable women, too. There are a few examples of this in questions in the archive, if you want to take a moment to search. 

Happy reading!

Sep 7

Don’t like it, don’t buy it?

Hey so my brother posted this to facebook. I’d love your take on it. I don’t agree with him, as spider-man has a REASON to be in that pose, as his powers include climbing walls, and he has to cling that way to keep him where he is, whereas Spider-woman’s powers and location have NO need for it.

http://thebestpageintheuniverse.net/c.cgi?u=spiderwomans_ass

*sigh*

My first impulse when I got this question was to write out all the things this guy’s whining about and translating it into what he actually means. The problem with this approach is that it won’t help. It won’t change his mind, or that of those who agree with him, and would only serve to fuel a flame war, and that’s the opposite of what I want this page to be about. 

I will say this: Maddox is entitled to his opinion and he has used a public forum to state it. Therefore, his opinion is open for criticism. My biggest problem with his opinion is that his entire premise is: 

"I don’t have a problem with this cover, so you shouldn’t either. If you do, you’re an idiot or a prude, or both."

He also calls in several false equivalences. The picture of the cover of Spider-Man is one where the superhero’s acting like a spider, not a sexdoll. He also completely discredits the opinion of those who were upset, disturbed or otherwise offended by this cover. And because he has a handful of Spider-Man butt pictures, that somehow invalidates the gazillion pieces of art where women are T&A before anything else. His redraw takes Spider-Man (whose bulge is barely defined, really) and turns him into Spider-Woman’s camel toe. So he took a non-sexual image and made an exaggeratedly sexual one in response, proving… that he’s completely missed the point. 

Oh, I also need to point out how he both tries to shame his opponents by calling them prudes for trying to take sexuality out of the women in comics, but at the same time tells us that sexualisation is in our heads and thus we’re perverts for seeing sex where there is none. And the irony doesn’t even register. 

Anyway, my basic rebuttal of the webpage on which the video is attached is we can choose to vote with our dollars, but thanks to the internet, we also can send our messages to the creators of those things we want to purchase, and let them know when they advertise something, “yes we like this and we will buy it” or “no, we don’t like this, change it so we will be more likely to buy it”. I feel this kind of opportunity is one we SHOULD take, but that option seems to be lost on this guy.

Basically, this guy’s a blatant example of male privilege at work, with the backlash of “women want to take my stuff away” (especially obvious in his last paragraph). There’s nothing I can say or show that will change his mind, because it’s already made up. 

And that’s sad. 

Sep 1

Carlo Pagulayan did these to illustrate what the poses would look like on a 3D model. You can find his original post here.
If you can’t access the link, Mr. Pagulayan comments:

Seeing the two covers I didn’t see anything wrong with the poses. Granted Land’s depiction of Silk’s anatomy is a bit fragile for my taste, but the pose still works.
SInce I don’t have a female model on call, I had to whip out Daz3d again to illustrate how the poses are perfectly plausible.
Being too technical makes some works stiff and generic, and to me the cover artist’s executions add a bit of grace compared to the other’s suggested corrections, which tends to be a bit more masculine.
A good artist can think in 3 dimensions and figure out how a figure would work. While also thinking of the field of view, or whatever lens effect (Fisheye, extrem perspective, etc). But then not all artist think the same or have the same imagination, and what you think is right, isn’t always the case for everyone, especially when you have different art styles.
That said, I’m sticking with the covers which to me are definitely better
Edit/Add: Also who’s to know what are the anatomical limitations of someone imbued with spider powers?

And on a personal note, you and your followers should probably look more at Milo Manara’s body of work before making all sorts of assumptions based on one not so great cover. Spider-Woman is NOT SQUATTING like you assumed. She is in the middle of climbing up a building with one leg still dangling off.
And your ‘correction’ of Greg Land’s cover looks like they’re in a jazz recital, not superheroes. 

Where do I start? 
First of all, I have to say thank you to Mr. Pagulayan for building a critique of my critique based on the critique itself. I can appreciate that. You are of course entitled to your opinion, and hope you will continue to let me be entitled to mine. 
You say you have no problem with the covers and that’s fine, but I do have a problem with them and that’s fine too. You’ve built 3D models to illustrate your points, and that takes a bit of extra dedication that I respect. Nicely done. I’d like to bring your attention to the differences between your 3D models and the actual cover art. 
When I redlined Greg Land’s cover, it was mostly because it was combined with Manara’s cover, which I found was a bigger issue. Land’s art is often traced, and what your 3D model shows me is that he possibly went from tracing photos to tracing 3D models. Hey, it’s fine to use reference to do your art! Manga Studio is built to have this exact functionality: importing 3D models and positioning them as you need in order to create your comic book art. That’s a really helpful tool, but sometimes, for some people, it becomes too much of a crutch in art. It stiffens everything up, plus there’s the fact that 3D models can be twisted in such a way that it goes beyond what is actually possible for a human body. 
As for Manara’s cover, where did I say anything against the man, or his body of work, at any point in my critique? I talked about this piece, this pose being problematic because of its overt sexuality where no sexual context was involved. I’ve explained this within my post. It saddens me how people jumped to conclusions about how I was insulting Manara’s body of work or his anatomy when all I commented on was the posing. 
Anyway, on to pictures. 


Oh, and for the record, dear submitter, they look like they’re in a jazz recital in the original cover, as well. I didn’t change the pose much at all. As for your comment of my drawings being more masculine, maybe it’s because you’re so used to seeing women drawn all about boobs and butts that anything out of that mold means femininity is lost. 
This said, I think it bears repeating: 


As comicartcorrections once posted: 

FYI, Comic Artists and Fanboys and Defenders of the Bad Anatomy!  Above is a beautiful example of sexuality on display versus a woman that is doing something awesome.On the top: Sexy.On the bottom: Woman At Work, Being Awesome.Nothing wrong with the top.  But don’t be drawing the top when your character is busy being the bottom one, okay?  Thank you.


Carlo Pagulayan did these to illustrate what the poses would look like on a 3D model. You can find his original post here.

If you can’t access the link, Mr. Pagulayan comments:

Seeing the two covers I didn’t see anything wrong with the poses. Granted Land’s depiction of Silk’s anatomy is a bit fragile for my taste, but the pose still works.

SInce I don’t have a female model on call, I had to whip out Daz3d again to illustrate how the poses are perfectly plausible.

Being too technical makes some works stiff and generic, and to me the cover artist’s executions add a bit of grace compared to the other’s suggested corrections, which tends to be a bit more masculine.

A good artist can think in 3 dimensions and figure out how a figure would work. While also thinking of the field of view, or whatever lens effect (Fisheye, extrem perspective, etc). But then not all artist think the same or have the same imagination, and what you think is right, isn’t always the case for everyone, especially when you have different art styles.

That said, I’m sticking with the covers which to me are definitely better

Edit/Add: Also who’s to know what are the anatomical limitations of someone imbued with spider powers?

And on a personal note, you and your followers should probably look more at Milo Manara’s body of work before making all sorts of assumptions based on one not so great cover. Spider-Woman is NOT SQUATTING like you assumed. She is in the middle of climbing up a building with one leg still dangling off.

And your ‘correction’ of Greg Land’s cover looks like they’re in a jazz recital, not superheroes. 

Where do I start? 

First of all, I have to say thank you to Mr. Pagulayan for building a critique of my critique based on the critique itself. I can appreciate that. You are of course entitled to your opinion, and hope you will continue to let me be entitled to mine. 

You say you have no problem with the covers and that’s fine, but I do have a problem with them and that’s fine too. You’ve built 3D models to illustrate your points, and that takes a bit of extra dedication that I respect. Nicely done. I’d like to bring your attention to the differences between your 3D models and the actual cover art. 

When I redlined Greg Land’s cover, it was mostly because it was combined with Manara’s cover, which I found was a bigger issue. Land’s art is often traced, and what your 3D model shows me is that he possibly went from tracing photos to tracing 3D models. Hey, it’s fine to use reference to do your art! Manga Studio is built to have this exact functionality: importing 3D models and positioning them as you need in order to create your comic book art. That’s a really helpful tool, but sometimes, for some people, it becomes too much of a crutch in art. It stiffens everything up, plus there’s the fact that 3D models can be twisted in such a way that it goes beyond what is actually possible for a human body. 

As for Manara’s cover, where did I say anything against the man, or his body of work, at any point in my critique? I talked about this piece, this pose being problematic because of its overt sexuality where no sexual context was involved. I’ve explained this within my post. It saddens me how people jumped to conclusions about how I was insulting Manara’s body of work or his anatomy when all I commented on was the posing. 

Anyway, on to pictures. 

Oh, and for the record, dear submitter, they look like they’re in a jazz recital in the original cover, as well. I didn’t change the pose much at all. As for your comment of my drawings being more masculine, maybe it’s because you’re so used to seeing women drawn all about boobs and butts that anything out of that mold means femininity is lost. 

This said, I think it bears repeating: 

As comicartcorrections once posted

FYI, Comic Artists and Fanboys and Defenders of the Bad Anatomy!  Above is a beautiful example of sexuality on display versus a woman that is doing something awesome.

On the top: Sexy.
On the bottom: Woman At Work, Being Awesome.

Nothing wrong with the top.  But don’t be drawing the top when your character is busy being the bottom one, okay?  Thank you.

Sep 1
eschergirls:


joodit submitted:


Let me just say that while I was scrolling to see the great critiques for Milo Manara’s Spider Woman as soon as that cover was released, I saw this little number & for some reason I couldn’t help but redraw this..
Personally this cover was weak in many ways, and definitely this article as a response & redraw was PERFECT.  The problem was in the way their body language was to convey conflict. There was no conflict.  AT ALL.
First of all, Batgirl’s leg was wrapped around Scorpiana’s thigh (WHY?).  This confused me because there was NOTHING in that image that would want Batgirl to STAY with Scorpiana (an electrified pincer-like attack & giant back-of-the-head stinger to the face are some things that should be avoided).  Then there’s the “tugging of the hair..embrace?”!  I thought the hair tugging is what made Batgirl wrap her leg around Scorpiana, maybe try to counteract the balance of being pulled in another direction..?  Nope.  The tension wasn’t pulling at her hair more than it was to disguise the fact that Scorpiana was pulling Batgirl IN.
And just putting it out there, these COMPLETELY different body languages (i.e. Batgirl pushing everything every which way AWAY from her only to WRAP HERSELF AROUND the villain..?!) make any sense?!  Did their minds say “no” but their bodies say “yes”!?
Anyway..upon observing just these two details, it was clear to me that this was some awkward tango-esque fight scene.  And in some digging (thanks Google), the artist’s intentions WERE to create a fight scene reminiscent of the tango (mainly because Scorpiana is an Argentinian villain & the most famous of Argentine dances is the tango)!  While I applaud his efforts for trying to create a scene of conflict with a famous dance..the tango is a very sensual, sexy dance.  His hint about using a move from the famous dance is more like a blunt object to the head, which ultimately dazes & confuses you into thinking that there was more of a sex vibe than a cultural one.
It’s difficult to incorporate something into an artwork without having your original intentions be skewed upon releasing it to the public because not EVERYONE has the same way of thinking.  And honestly, I would have just thought that this was just another anatomically-incorrect-for-the-sake-of-hot-babe-action.  Instead, I now see it as an anatomically-incorrect-for-the-sake-of-trying-to-be-subtly-cultural.
Speaking of anatomy, Batgirl’s spine is quite honestly thee thinnest, bendiest spine I have seen in a while.  Why?  It seems like the elasticity of her spine has made itself clear in her neck. Pushing her back & pushing her neck in opposite directions will surely sever that poor thing that is her skeletal structure.  As well as her head that seems to be unaware it’s moving too far away.  But for whatever reason, as structurally unsound her body looks, Batgirl lives.  Believe me when I say my rendering of anatomy is NOT accurate, but if it LOOKS somewhat structurally sound then it can work.  This cover didn’t have that stability.

In the redraw, I immediately discarded the fact that this was meant to be a tango scene (and while the tango is sexual, it also conveys a strong feeling of trust..I mean, look at how close & how fluid tango partners are with their movements.  IT’S FREAKIN’ AWESOME, but that is NOT the feeling I wanted to convey between Batgirl & Scorpiana).  I also tried NOT to have Batgirl’s body bend in an unnatural fashion.
I tried to create a scenario where the very details I noticed about the image that threw me off were to be justified.  I had the Scorpiana threatening Batgirl off the ledge of a building by her hair (sorry for not drawing the buildings, maybe next time..), stinging her with her stinger or pincer-like thing or choke her.  This would all justify why Batgirl would wrap her leg around Scorpiana’s thigh.
Is my redraw anatomically accurate?  Nope.  But at least Batgirl’s head isn’t poppin’ off any time soon, nor are the two going to dance while killing each other.

Thanks for all the work you did to explain what’s going on in the original, and finding out the intent of the artist! :)  I had thought it looked like a dance too (as had another redrawer) but it’s good to know for sure.
And also thanks for going through your entire thought process as to why you drew your version the way you did, and what you thought it should convey thematically.  I love seeing different people’s takes on pictures featured on this blog, and I especially enjoy reading people’s breakdowns of what the scene evoked for them and how they see it.

It’s good to know that the original artist intended this to be a tango-like pose, but I definitely agree that this required retooling. This is very nicely done. 

eschergirls:

Let me just say that while I was scrolling to see the great critiques for Milo Manara’s Spider Woman as soon as that cover was released, I saw this little number & for some reason I couldn’t help but redraw this..

Personally this cover was weak in many ways, and definitely this article as a response & redraw was PERFECT.  The problem was in the way their body language was to convey conflict. There was no conflict.  AT ALL.

First of all, Batgirl’s leg was wrapped around Scorpiana’s thigh (WHY?).  This confused me because there was NOTHING in that image that would want Batgirl to STAY with Scorpiana (an electrified pincer-like attack & giant back-of-the-head stinger to the face are some things that should be avoided).  Then there’s the “tugging of the hair..embrace?”!  I thought the hair tugging is what made Batgirl wrap her leg around Scorpiana, maybe try to counteract the balance of being pulled in another direction..?  Nope.  The tension wasn’t pulling at her hair more than it was to disguise the fact that Scorpiana was pulling Batgirl IN.

And just putting it out there, these COMPLETELY different body languages (i.e. Batgirl pushing everything every which way AWAY from her only to WRAP HERSELF AROUND the villain..?!) make any sense?!  Did their minds say “no” but their bodies say “yes”!?

Anyway..upon observing just these two details, it was clear to me that this was some awkward tango-esque fight scene.  And in some digging (thanks Google), the artist’s intentions WERE to create a fight scene reminiscent of the tango (mainly because Scorpiana is an Argentinian villain & the most famous of Argentine dances is the tango)!  While I applaud his efforts for trying to create a scene of conflict with a famous dance..the tango is a very sensual, sexy dance.  His hint about using a move from the famous dance is more like a blunt object to the head, which ultimately dazes & confuses you into thinking that there was more of a sex vibe than a cultural one.

It’s difficult to incorporate something into an artwork without having your original intentions be skewed upon releasing it to the public because not EVERYONE has the same way of thinking.  And honestly, I would have just thought that this was just another anatomically-incorrect-for-the-sake-of-hot-babe-action.  Instead, I now see it as an anatomically-incorrect-for-the-sake-of-trying-to-be-subtly-cultural.

Speaking of anatomy, Batgirl’s spine is quite honestly thee thinnest, bendiest spine I have seen in a while.  Why?  It seems like the elasticity of her spine has made itself clear in her neck. Pushing her back & pushing her neck in opposite directions will surely sever that poor thing that is her skeletal structure.  As well as her head that seems to be unaware it’s moving too far away.  But for whatever reason, as structurally unsound her body looks, Batgirl lives.  Believe me when I say my rendering of anatomy is NOT accurate, but if it LOOKS somewhat structurally sound then it can work.  This cover didn’t have that stability.

In the redraw, I immediately discarded the fact that this was meant to be a tango scene (and while the tango is sexual, it also conveys a strong feeling of trust..I mean, look at how close & how fluid tango partners are with their movements.  IT’S FREAKIN’ AWESOME, but that is NOT the feeling I wanted to convey between Batgirl & Scorpiana).  I also tried NOT to have Batgirl’s body bend in an unnatural fashion.

I tried to create a scenario where the very details I noticed about the image that threw me off were to be justified.  I had the Scorpiana threatening Batgirl off the ledge of a building by her hair (sorry for not drawing the buildings, maybe next time..), stinging her with her stinger or pincer-like thing or choke her.  This would all justify why Batgirl would wrap her leg around Scorpiana’s thigh.

Is my redraw anatomically accurate?  Nope.  But at least Batgirl’s head isn’t poppin’ off any time soon, nor are the two going to dance while killing each other.

Thanks for all the work you did to explain what’s going on in the original, and finding out the intent of the artist! :)  I had thought it looked like a dance too (as had another redrawer) but it’s good to know for sure.

And also thanks for going through your entire thought process as to why you drew your version the way you did, and what you thought it should convey thematically.  I love seeing different people’s takes on pictures featured on this blog, and I especially enjoy reading people’s breakdowns of what the scene evoked for them and how they see it.

It’s good to know that the original artist intended this to be a tango-like pose, but I definitely agree that this required retooling. This is very nicely done. 

Sep 1

Hey, I want to thank you for doing this. I just found your blog, and what really struck me is how GOOD these women looked once they were given realistic bodies and positions. They look dynamic, powerful, heroic. Seeing them makes me happy and depressed simultaneously - they're great, but I realise how much we're missing by not getting them in the original products. If women like that were featured more often, I might yet get into comics. Thanks for your work, I love it!

Thanks a lot! 

However, I realise that this is one of the problems with a blog like this one. Because it concentrates the problem situations into one spot, it can make people feel that this is an overwhelming problem that makes them want to run away from it, or it can raise some people’s hackles in feeling like all there is is nothing but griping. 

eschergirls (which is a great eye-opening blog about the issues and the source of many of the redlines I’ve done or reblogged) and lesstitsnass both have this. I’ve tried, in the early days of lesstitsnass, to point out some awesome work at the same time as I’ve posted some redraws, but the focus became a lot more on the redraws than the good work being done by some fantastic comic book artists out there. 

So that’s why, after reading this post of yours, for people like you who are turned off by the sexualisation of the female body in comics, I’ve decided to create a sister blog to this one, which takes the second half of the title of this one: morekickinass, and I invite people to search for and submit great comic book art of women, so people can see how excellent it is when it’s done right. 

Sep 1

Hi! I was just wondering if you already have posted or would be willing to post some tutorials/basics on how you draw the way you do, and maybe some resources for how to get a better understanding of the human form? Your anatomy is always so realistic and amazing, and you seem to have an in-depth knowledge of how the body does the thing and what it should NOT look like because OH MY GOD WHERE DID HER PELVIS GO, ect. Thanks for your time, and have a nice day!

Hi! 

I haven’t posted any tutorials specifically about this, but I have made book recommendations as well as told people repeatedly about the incredible value of life drawing classes.

I do have something in the works in terms of tutorials: I’ve started work on a book about using observational art in order to draw from your head. I really want to set aside time to work on it, but work is often very time consuming and the idea of writing+drawing a whole book is something that seems very daunting to me. I’ll need to really actively block out time in my week to work on this thing so I can actually get it done! 

If you are really interested in getting the life drawing training I received (and have the cash to invest in that education), I will recommend Samantha Youssef’s training offered at Studio Technique. I’ve mentioned Disney veteran animator/professional artistic trainer Samantha before in this blog and what I’ve learned from her has been invaluable to me. 

Best of luck! 

Sep 1

I like your work a lot in general, but the boob tutorial (I'm not even sure if this is yours) is off. I worked as a nude art photographer for several years and I have seen many, many breasts, mostly natural. There are various shapes of natural breast, even at larger sizes. From a biological perspective, breasts also vary in makeup. Most breasts are predominately fatty tissue but some are much more muscular. In short, you can't tell if a woman's breasts are real by their shape.

There are two or three breast tutorials I reblogged it from other artists, and the general idea is sound. However, you’re right, there are many, many breast shapes; however saying a breast is muscular isn’t strictly right as the pectoral muscle lies underneath the breast. I can see how the strength/bulk of it might change the shape of the breast, though. 

All in all, the tutorials are there to mostly make people think about how breasts are shaped, where they are positioned, and how they react to gravity, pressure, constriction, etc. Any tutorial is not the end-all of “this is how you MUST do things”, but one of many learning tools out there. 

As far as natural/augmented breasts and how you can tell goes, there is a line in that tutorial (if it’s the one I’m thinking of) that says something along the lines of “which one’s real, which one’s fake? It’s none of your business” with the two side-by-side girls who look like they have identical breasts. So really… the point of it remains that in order to draw breasts that look right, the best thing to do is to observe breasts and draw them. 

Sep 1

Re: Manara cover redlines

Just to let you know: I have received a lot of messages regarding this. A lot of them repeat each other, and a lot point out the same things. I will try and condense things into few posts, combine several of your asks together, so as to not fill dashboards with a bunch of asks that will likely be repetitive after a while. This will take me some time because, like I said, there’s a LOT of material to go through here.

Thanks for your patience! 

A woman wrote this. Yes I’m a woman. And I wrote this. It contains opinions.

kanthara:

keiren-smith:

Been asked for my opinion (in phone calls and PMs I’ve gotten) and I’ve pointed out that I’ve tried to not comment on ‘the’ cover directly (I’m sure I slipped up somewhere! Gotta be honest, I giggle so hard every time I see it that it’s hard to put a thought together). My entire point, my near-constant argument in life, is that people get to have opinions… and by people, I mean “women”.

Short version:  most women are terrified to speak out loud and express an opinion. They are utterly petrified to do so when they are addressing issues of women, sexism and feminism. The internet has emboldened women to speak out more—but it has also enabled men to easily put more effort into silencing them, or threatening them into silence. When I say “terrified” I mean TERRIFIED. All of you were able to grasp how horrible it was when Janelle Assellin wrote about the death and rape threats she gets…none of you seem to get that the constant onslaught of mockery, sneering and general disrespect is equally exhausting. (Do consider, gentlemen:  You find a woman daring to criticise a working comics pro or illustrator as “disrespectful”, appalling, etc. but you have utterly no problem with mocking her or her defenders across the internet and starting memes to continue that mocking. She’s not entitled to her opinion…so she’s entitled to YOURS telling her that.) Most women I know fear having that spill into public encounters with these men, and having to work or socialise in now-toxic environments. To that end, I have had many private talks with women genuinely upset with the online discussion about the cover, or the levels of vitriol found in the social media accounts of men, even comics pros, they admire. Thus, they are fearful to engage.

The first argument is, of course, that YOU are equally entitled to your opinion.

Read More

Thank you so much for this, Keiren! Your support and explanations really mean a lot to me. I’m reblogging this in both my main tumblr and lesstitsnass. 

Also a big thank you to Yanick Paquette, who pointed me towards this post in Facebook, and revised his stance about the situation after reaching out to me and chatting. The positive feedback REALLY outweighs the negative crap I’ve been getting, and I’m grateful for each and every piece of constructive commentary I’ve been receiving (yes, even the ones that disagree with me, if the issue is about the topic at hand, not on my person or other derailing tactics). 

This is how criticism works, people. I commented about a piece that I thought was a problem in its posing. People who’ve disagreed with me by sending me 3D models showing the pose are actually arguing for the validity of the anatomy, and these are VALID CRITICISMS of my own criticisms. YES. This is how it works. I will comment on these as soon as I can, but first I have 5 pages of script left to storyboard on this episode, and I want to deliver tonight. Yay deadlines!